Haiti 2010 Earthquake Response

Business revives amid fears of loup-garou

Photo from UNDP at Flickr.

In Haiti today, huge challenges remain just to meet basic needs of food, water, sanitation, shelter and security. AP reports a seven-day backlog of flights waiting to land with needed relief supplies, and while an estimated 2 million people need food, only 500,000 have any. Thousands of children in Haiti are struggling on their own without parents, vulnerable to kidnapping by child predators and traffickers, not to mention illness, injury and other threats.  The fears of Haitians are taking shape as the imagined presence of loup-garou.

Meanwhile, there are signs of life at businesses that survived the destruction.  People are returning to shop at cellphone providers, street markets, clothing shops and banks, although cash remains in short supply.  They’re seeking more than the basics, too.

Haitians are buying nails to make initial repairs, searching out “tri-tri” – a powder of tiny dried fish used to season rice – and even getting haircuts: all of which means that, slowly, the economy is showing signs of life after being knocked out by the Jan. 12 earthquake. [CSM]

Photo from UNDP at Flickr.

At the University of Alabama, senior Will Thomas asks, “Where were we before the earthquake? And, more importantly, where will we be once the news coverage stops?”  Then, he answers his own question, writing:

Whatever you do, be there for your fellow man once the disaster in Haiti is no longer in the headlines, or before the next disaster strikes someone else. Whether you feel compelled to act for Haiti or for Tuscaloosa, act nonetheless.


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